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The Complete Guide To Cepheus Constellation
Cepheus Constellation Located at high latitudes in the northern sky, the constellation Cepheus, with its many bright stars, looks like a large house drawn by a child, but is often overlooked because its neighbouring constellations are more dazzling. On the northern shore of the Milky Way, it holds many forgotten ‘treasures’. Cepheus in Greek mythology represents the king of Ethiopia, husband of Cassiopeia and father of the princess Andromeda. Cepheus constellation is famous for the variable stars in it, as the prototypes of at least three different types of pulsating stars have been found in it. The brightest of these,...
The Complete Guide To Draco Constellation
The definition of Draco Constellation DracoAbbreviationDraGenitive CaseDraconisSymbolDragonRight Ascension17hDeclination+65°Area1083deg2Bright Stars (magnitude<3)3Brightest StarEltanin (γ Draco)Adjoining constellationsBootes, Hercules, Lyra, Cygnus, Cephei …Fully visible region+90° ~ −15°Optimal observational durationJuly Draco, a constellation that can be seen all year round in the northern night sky, lies north of Corona Borealis. Draco is one of the 88 modern constellations, and one of Ptolemy’s 48 constellations. Draco is located in the north of Corona Borealis. It does look like a dragon winding in the Ursa Major, Ursa Minor and Hercules within a wild range. The soaring dragon head, which abutted Hercules, is made up of four stars, forming a quadrilateral, with the two brightest stars representing the dragon’s eyes. It has an area of 1083 square degrees, which ranks eighth in the whole sky. The...
The Complete Guide to Canes Venatici Constellation
Definition of Canes Venatici Constellation Latin NameCanes VenaticiAbbreviationCVnAdjoining ConstellationsBootes, Ursa Major, Leo, Coma BerenicesRank38Area465deg2Width30°Depth20°Fully visible region90°N~37°SOther informationoriginally part of Ursa Major Canes Venatici is a small constellation in the northern sky. It was created by Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius to represent Chara and Asterion (the two dogs led by Bootes) in the 17th century. It is one of the three constellations representing the dog, along with Canis Major and Canis Minor. Hevelius The range occupied by CVn: right ascension 12h4min ~ 14h5min; declination +28°~ +53°; an area of 467 square degrees. There are 42 stars brighter than magnitude 6 in CVn, but most of them are dark. The Way to Find Canes Venatici α CVn...
The Complete Guide To Boötes Constellation
Definition Latin NameBoötesAbbreviationBooArea907km2Rank13Number of Bright Stars3Brightest Starα BooMeteor ShowerJanuary Bootids / June Bootids / QuadrantidsAdjoining ConstellationsVirgo, Ursa Major, Canes Venatici .etc.Optimal Observational DurationMay~JuneOptimal Observational Dimension+90°~-50°Fully visible region90°N~35°S Boötes is one of the 88 constellations in the sky, located north-east of Virgo, about 30 degrees wide and 50 degrees high. It is one of 88 modern constellations, and one of 48 constellations described by Ptolemy (the astronomer in second century).  Boötes contains the fourth brightest star in the night sky: the orange giant Arcturus. Boötes is also home to many other bright stars, including eight brighter than magnitude 4 and 21 brighter than magnitude 5, for a total of 29 stars easily visible to the naked...
The Complete Guide to Leo Constellation: Origin, History and Facts
Leo and Leo Minor Leo is one of the most recognisable signs of the zodiac. In mythology, it is Nemean the Lion, who was slain by the great hero Hercules. Leo is one of the few constellations whose shape and name live up to their name. Unfortunately, however, this is not the case with the near neighbour, Leo Minor. Almost every culture in the world imagines this constellation as a lion. As one of the 12 tasks of Hercules, Nimean the Lion was killed. The large curved arc on the front side of the constellation forms the famous “Scythe of...
The Complete Guide to Ursa Minor Constellation: Origins, Facts and Mythology
The definition of Ursa Minor Ursa Minor is a constellation closest to the north celestial pole,which is included in Ptolemy and the modern 88 constellations. Ursa Minor marks the north celestial pole, and the brightest star in this constellation:α UMi, is the Polaris. The tail of the Ursa Minor can be seen as the handle of a bucket (or spoon), hence it also can be called “Little Dipper” : four of the seven stars form a ladle on the dipper, like the Big Dipper. Ptolemy (the astronomer in the 2nd century AD) included Ursa Minor in his 48 constellations. The main information of...